Good news! Agriculture Victoria update: Eradication of isolated serrated tussock

It is not often we can deliver good news about one of the country’s most invasive plants, serrated tussock, but we recently received an update from Agriculture Victoria that contained some great news for landowners and the community. Agriculture Victoria, a state government agency that sits within the Department of Energy, Environment and Climate Action (DEECA), have successfully eradicated 13 isolated (satellite) infestations of serrated tussock since 2019 in the Port Phillip and Westernport catchment.

These 13 infestations now have ten years of absence, where an extensive eradication inspection of the properties and surrounding areas has confirmed that the serrated tussock has been eradicated. Agriculture Victoria has developed a process to assess the potential for eradication, which has involved subject experts reviewing the data, seed viability and landscape considerations. Agriculture Victoria manage a total of 76 satellite infestations of serrated tussock across the Port Phillip and Westernport Catchment, with the 13 eradicated infestations equating to 17% of the total satellite infestations, an impressive figure.

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Image 1: A serrated tussock plant controlled with a registered herbicide (VSTWP).

Agriculture Victoria also noted that the eradicated infestations in the south and east of the catchment were in areas that are particularly susceptible to invasion based on vegetation type, soil type and climate, such as the Mornington Peninsula region. Agriculture Victoria have been focusing on undertaking surveillance around these infestations and undertaking inspections to be confident there is no more serrated tussock in line with their containment plan, which prioritises satellite infestations.

The VSTWP would like to thank Agriculture Victoria for their persistent and strategic approach to preventing the further spread of the invasive serrated tussock across Victoria.

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Image 2: Serrated tussock needs to be controlled prior to seeding, each season, to prevent further spread.